Invemar
Bulletin of Marine and Coastal Research

NOTES ON THE BIOLOGY OF Oncideres bouchardii BATES (Coleóptera: Cerambycidae), A TRUPILLO TWIG GIRDTER FROM SANTA MARTA, COLOMBIA

Friedemann Koster

Abstract


Aspects of the biology of Oncideres bouchardii Bates from Santa Marta, Colombia are described. Imagines of this twig girdler appear shortly after the rainy season during the months of November to February, ringing twigs and branches of trupillo trees, Prosopis juliflora (L.) and aromo bushes, Acacia fameÿiana Willd. Observations showed that this activity is only performed by the females, which commonly copulate at the same time. After girdling the twig, the females lay their white eggs one by one into especially prepared egg cavities that are sealed after oviposition. There is evidence that locating the entrance to the future egg chamber with the ovipositor is greatly facilitated by means of a marking on the bark made with the ovipositor while making the entrance with the mandibles. The eggs are deposited by means of the telescopic and inflatable ovipositor which is inserted deeply under the bark through hemolymph pressure and acts to force open the egg chamber between bark and wood. After approximately a week the larvae hatch and soon dig into the drying twig. The lifecycle of Oncideres bouchardii lasts one year, the longest part of it belonging to the larval stage. Most imagines live less than a week or two, although a few survive as long as 45 days. In places where much destruction of the trees is caused by this twig girdler, it is recommended to collect and burn the girdled twigs or branches that contain the woodboring larvae or eggs of the species.

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DOI: 10.25268/bimc.invemar.1978.10.0.513

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